The best new albums released in August – The Vinyl Factory

Summer, sorted.

Rave, rarities, gut-wrenching rock ‘n’ roll and rap revivalism: The best tracks, and when to pack them in August.


Neil Young + The Promise of Reality

Noise & Flowers

(Warning)

Due: 5 August

What was planned as an ordinary nine-date European tour in 2019 turned into something quite different for Neil Young and his backing band Promise Of The Real following the death of 76-year-old Elliot Roberts. . Roberts had managed Young throughout his career and his passing. just two weeks before the wheels start for the European tour, the trip has turned into something of an extended memorial service. Young has described the opportunity to pay tribute night after night as “wonderful,” and that feeling is captured here on a deluxe live album that spans the journey. –WP


Kokoroko

Could we be more

(Brownswood Recordings)

Due: 5 August

It’s hard to believe this will be London’s Kokoroko’s first LP to release, given the masses they’ve entertained with their live performances since their breakthrough with 2018’s ‘Abusey Junction’ – a standout cut from Brownswood this year. We here compilation. Could we be more seeks to distill the freewheeling jazz-via-Afrobeat style of the eight-piece into 15 tracks, and does so with a poise that snaps its fingers and rocks its hips. –WP


Enter the mall

what i breathe

(Look for trouble)

Due: 5 August

Rave, raunch, Nia Archives, Novelist, jungle, grime, D Double E and Turnstile frontman Brendan Yates is a pretty healthy list of ingredients for a debut album. Which is good for Mall Grab, because that’s exactly what the UK-via-Australia producer had to work with for his project some time ago. what i breathe. However, it’s best when it strips it to the bone: dive into the running breaks and raw synths of “Breathing” to find out what it sounds like. –WP


Hudson Mohawk

cry sugar

(Chain)

Due: August 12

Kanye’s favorite Glasgow follows last year’s Heeter mixtape with his first album since the 2016 soundtrack of Ubisoft’s dystopian surveillance Watch dogs. Not straying much further from this path, he turns to apocalyptic film music for inspiration. Expect gloom and gloom. –WP


Danger mouse and black thought

Cheat Codes

(BMG)

Due: August 12

Two of the best at doing it in soul-sampling and headbopping hip-hop come together with surprisingly fun and great results. A posthumous twist from MF DOOM rubs shoulders with verses from future torchbearers like Joey Bada$$ and Conway The Machine, and all the while the beats keep tripping. Beautiful. –WP


Madonna

Finally enough love

(Warning)

Due: August 19

While a 16-track teaser of Finally enough love was originally released in June, the planned full package lands this month. Celebrating 50 Billboard Dance Club number-one hits – the milestone Madonna hit in 2020 with “Girl Gone Wild” – the compilation includes remixes from artists including Honey Dijon, Felix Da Housecat and Bob Sinclair, plus never-before-seen material. . Get into the groove. – L/R


The cats

Getting fucked

(Bargain Discs)

Due: August 19

The acts don’t come much more directly than The Cats from Queensland. Continuing to plumb and skewer the shallow depths of Aussie culture, the rag-tag garage punk band this time delivers tracks such as ‘The Price Of Smokes’, ‘Paid Late’ and the inspirational ‘I’ve Been Drunk In Every Pub”. In Brisbane’. Come in, losers, it’s kick-off time. –WP


Kaitlyn Aurelia Smith

Let’s turn it into sound

(Ghostly)

Due: August 26

Kaitlyn Aurelia Smith’s new album, Let’s turn it into sound, questions our modes of communication. Created over the course of three manic months, Smith created a new vocal processing technique to complement his existing toolbox of synths. As she says, “The album is a puzzle.” – L/R


Lou Reed

Words and music, May 1965

(Light in the attic)

Due: August 26

Light in the Attic continues to prove itself as a titan of reissues and rare releases with this collection of unreleased early work by Lou Reed. Recorded with the help of John Cale, only to be sealed for almost 50 years, Words and music, May 1965 includes early versions of “Heroin”, “I’m Waiting for the Man”, and “Pale Blue Eyes”. The album offers a rare glimpse of Reed as a young artist, his songs imbued with a sense of youthful experimentation. – L/R


blonde

Against the odds: 1974-1982

(UMe/Group Number)

Due: August 26

Blondie’s latest offering is about as expansive as it gets. Against the odds: 1974-1982 features the band’s first six studio albums, plus a collection of rare demos, alternate versions and studio takes. Along with the sound offerings, the box set also includes two books with liner notes, track commentary from the band themselves, and photos. One for the real heads. – L/R


Diamond Galas

Broken gargoyles

(Intravenous sound operations)

Due: August 26

Avant-garde extraordinaire Diamanda Galás returns this month with an album intense enough Broken gargoyles. Focusing on 13th-century plague victims and World War I medical services, the album finds Galás using his own manipulated voice to probe “the weaving and warping transformation of the nervous system of post-traumatic soldiers and dying patients”. Not your usual summer sound, this one. – L/R


Lee “Scratch” Perry

King Scratch (Arch Upset Musical Masterpieces)

(Trojan)

Due: August 26

The world lost one of the all-time greats with the passing of Lee “Scratch” Perry last year. This exceptional compilation lands almost exactly one year to the day since Perry’s death, and is a beautiful tribute. The four-disc set collects treasured hits alongside rare and previously unreleased mixes, plus a 50-page illustrated book by Perry’s official biographer David Katz and photos by Adrian Boot. –WP

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